Genre- Traditional Literature

Title: The Stone Cutter

Author: Pam Newton

Publisher: G.P. Putman’s Sons

Age Level: Elementary (3-4) or Upper (5-6)

Date: 1990

Summary: “A retelling of a traditional Indian tale in which a discontented stonecutter is never satisfied with each wish is granted him.”

Strengths: I truly loved this book. The illustrations were really detailed and fun. The language was discriptive and filled with emotion. I could feel for teh stonecutter as he was in each in wish. I liked that each time he wanted to be something else, he repeated “then I would be truly happy.” I feel if this was read to students they would start to jump in on that line and repeat with the teacher. My favorite part was the ending. I did not see it coming, I thought he might be stuck as something he didn’t want to be. The stonecutter realizes that being a stonecutter is exactly what he wants to be. This teaches kids, the grass isn’t always greener on the other side.

Concerns: I felt the tigger in the book was just thrown in there. I thought the tiger would be the one to grant the wishes, but it was the mountain spirit. I didn’t understand what the point of adding the tigger was.

Classroom Use: This book could be read in a lesson about traditional literature or folk tales. This book teaches a great lesson. It could also be read just for the lesson it teaches to students.

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Published in: on March 1, 2009 at 6:34 am  Leave a Comment  

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